Clear (flyclear.com), the fast pass for airport security, officially opened lanes yesterday at Reagan National and Washington Dulles International Airports, amidst record-breaking traffic in a pre-launch test period. Clear provides its members with an unprecedented solution to the security bottlenecks that have become a routine aspect of flying. D.C.-area fliers now have faster passage through airport security at both airports no matter where or which airline they fly.

More than 300 Clear members used the lanes in the first day of unannounced testing March 14. "It was like serving food at a new restaurant before its lights were even on or its opening was even announced," says Clear CEO Steven Brill. "All of these people just showed up, some from D.C., where we've already signed up about 3,500 people and others from among the more than 118,000 people who have signed up across the country and who've been waiting for Reagan and Dulles to get Clear.”

Clear members are pre-screened by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) and, after application approval, are provided with a card that allows exclusive access to Clear's security lanes nationwide. The high-tech Clear card verifies a fingerprint or iris image selected by members during enrollment.

"Finally, we have a chance to see the registered Traveler Program in action," remarked Representative Dan Lungren, R-Calif., Ranking Member, Transportation Security Subcomittee of the House Homeland Security Committee. "I have always believed we could combine customer-friendly innovation with a continued commitment to aviation security. This is one more step in that direction."

"I'm a member of Clear's Registered Traveler Program and appreciate the improvement it has on air travel," noted Representative Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., member of the House Homeland Security Committee. "It helps free up my calendar by reducing the time I spend waiting in airport lines."

"New Registered Traveler lanes at Washington Reagan National Airport and Washington Dulles International Airport bring the number of U.S. airports with Registered Traveler to 16," said Bill Connors, executive director and chief operating officer, National Business Traveler Association. "As the program continues to expand, the country will see increased benefits. Business travelers participating in the program will save time and increase productivity; all security lines at participating airports and terminals will be shorter; and, because registered travelers have already been pre-screened, precious airport security resources can be used more effectively."

Though Clear members still proceed through metal detectors and X-ray machines operated and regulated by the government, Clear expedites the rest of the process through customer service activities, such as assisting passengers with their bins, a service that alone has made Clear lanes 30 percent faster than regular security lanes.

Clear lanes are already operating in airports in Cincinnati, Denver, Indianapolis, Newark, N.J., and San Francisco, in addition to New York's LaGuardia and JFK airports.